Former kid Abdul Qadir died on Friday in Lahore after a heart attack, his family confirmed. According to family sources, Abdul Qa...

Former cricketer Abdul Qadir died in 63



Former kid Abdul Qadir died on Friday in Lahore after a heart attack, his family confirmed.

According to family sources, Abdul Qadir was rushed to the hospital immediately after suffering a heart attack and was declared dead and reported to have left the world before arriving at the hospital. "My father never had a heart problem, so it was sudden and moving that he suffered a severe attack and could not survive," said Salman Qadir.

Abdul Qadir has been the chief selector of the Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) as well as a commentator. He played in 67 Tests taking 236 wickets and 104 One Day Internationals (ODI) and bagged 132 wickets as a national team representative.

He started his career with a Test against Lahore in England on December 14, 1977, and played in Lahore (the last Test against the West Indies) on December 6, 1990. He played the ODI against New Zealand in Birmingham on 11 June 1983. playing his last ODI against Sri Lanka in Sharjah on November 2, 1993.



Abdul Qadir was born on September 15, 1955 in Lahore. He has four children, Rehman Qadir, Imran Qadir, Salman Qadir and Usman Qadir.

The PCB expressed their deepest condolences for the master's shocking death.

Qadir, who turned 64 on September 15, was one of the favorites of former Captain Imran Khan - who is now Pakistan's prime minister.

Qadir's unique dance act was as appealing as it was, the ball rotated elegantly and had a deadly googly and a flipper.

Australian legend Shane Warne - the wicket-keeper of the second best test of the 708 (only behind Sri Lanka's Muttiah Muralitharan) - was also a big fan of Qadir.

Former Pakistan captain Wasim Akram, Moin Khan, Rashid Latif and Waqar Younis addressed condolences, saying that Qadir's death was "a major loss to Pakistan's cricket".

"We lost a great man who was himself an institution," said Wasim, who played against Qadir in the 1980s.

Cricket has thanked Abdul Qadir for keeping his wrists alive during the darker years of the 70s and 80s.

Qadir's action was an unusual occurrence, and he repeatedly admitted that it was a show to distract cider makers. Variety was the key; he was said to have had more than six deliveries.

Recall that Abdul Qadir's brother Ali Bahadur also played in the first 10 games in 1987-88.

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